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Adriano Manocchia named Official Conservation Artist

Ronald G. Dodson, Chairman of ISC-Audubon announced today that Adriano Manocchia has been named the Official Conservation Artist of ISC-Audubon. Through this position with the not-for-profit ISC-Audubon, Manocchia will be working with the organization to generate awareness of the importance of conservation oriented landscape management at home, work and at play.

Dodson said, “As Official Conservation Artist”, Manocchia will contribute through his art in raising awareness for the ISC-Audubon Adriano-fishing-2-low-resConservation Landscapes for America initiative, which is aimed at motivating people to become personally engaged in conservation and sustainability where they live, work, and play.

“We are very excited and honored that Adriano has agreed to become associated with our organization”, comments Mr. Dodson.

Manocchia said, “I first met and collaborated with Ron when he was working with the National Audubon Society and later with the Audubon Society of New York State. We lost connection for several years but I am very pleased to have now reconnected with Ron. I'm very supporting of the efforts he is now spearheading through ISC-Audubon and I’m honored to contribute to their success through my artistic vision.”

Dodson and Manocchia worked together with the support of the United States Golf Association (USGA) in the past to produce a series of golf related art that featured some of the top conservation oriented golf course facilities in the country. Dodson said that the present role that Manocchia will fill, will not only include golf conservation, but will feature artwork of other subjects including waterscapes, sporting art, wildlife and landscapes. His work captures some of the most magnificent conservation efforts in America.

Manocchia, a New Yorker who has been a full time painter for the last thirty years, is perhaps best known for his sporting art. His paintings have been displayed at such prestigious venues as the American Museum of Fly Fishing in Manchester, Vermont. In June, 1997, the Catskill Fly Fishing Museum in Livingston Manor, New York exhibited Manocchia's work, along with the work of artist Mark Susinno, in a show called Above and Below. Manocchia also has often focused his attention on wildlife, especially the North American mammals that share his own watery and wooded habitat: moose, deer and wolves.

ISC-Audubon and Ronald G. Dodson

ISC-Audubon is a not-for-profit education and advocacy organization committed to encouraging people to practice conservation and sustainability where they live, work and play.

Ronald G. Dodson is a wildlife biologist and natural resource planner who has worked for over 35 years in the conservation field. Dodson has authored a number of books and publications on wildlife management, sustainability and has created a number of award winning conservation and certification programs. As Chairman of ISC-Audubon Dodson leads the conservation and policy development efforts of ISC-Audubon.

Adriano Manocchia Bio: http://adriano-art.com 

Adriano Manocchia, born in New York in 1951, began a career in photo-journalism while completing his BA degree for literature from Pace University in New York. Upon completion of college, Adriano ran his own photo/film agency covering events for television and print media. His work has taken him aboard the aircraft carrier Nimitz, on mid-air refueling missions, on the Goodyear Blimp, and on numerous assignments to the White House.

In 1983, Adriano began spending his free time painting. A year later he decided to undertake this new challenge full time. Through his art, he has supported Ducks Unlimited, Atlantic Salmon Federation, Trout Unlimited, Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation, American Cancer Society and the Special Olympics. His limited edition prints - Giant Panda and Snow Leopard - were endorsed by the National Zoo in Washington and the New York Zoological Society. A Bald Eagle painting was chosen to commemorate the 200th anniversary of the Constitution by the U.S. Bicentennial Committee, with the image reproduced on a poster and collector plate. Adriano's work helped raise over $250,000 for Ducks Unlimited through their Sponsor Print Program from 1990 to 1992. He participated in the North Atlantic Ducks Unlimited Flyway Artist program in 1991 and 1992 and was N.Y. Audubon Society Earth Day artist in 1993. He was selected Artist of the Quarter in 1991 and 1995 for the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation and sponsor artist in 1992 and 1996. Several of his paintings were featured in the hardcover collector's book Fine Art of Georgia's Fairways. His art has appeared on the NBC Today Show, State Of the Art, and Woods n' Water TV Show. His work has been widely published both in Europe and the United States.

Adriano's paintings won the prestigious OWAA/DuPont Art Award in 1989 through 1991. His work has appeared in Gray's Sporting Slow-Drift-12-x-24Journal, Flyfishing, Fly Rod & Reel, Collector Editions, Outdoor Life, Premiere (Monte Carlo), Wildlife Art, Conservationist, Pescare (Italy), Flyfishing Quarterly, Bugle, U.S. Art, Sporting Classics, and Flyfisher (Japan). Following a sold out show at the American Museum Of Fly Fishing in Manchester, Vermont in 1992, Adriano traveled to Europe to introduce his work and was the featured artist at the 8th Annual International Fishing Expo in Verona, Italy. In 1997 his paintings were featured at a retrospective sporting art show at the National Museum of Wildlife Art in Jackson, Wyoming, in a one-man show at Trailside Galleries in Jackson Hole, and at the Catskill Fly Fishing Museum in Livingston Manor, New York, in a two-man show entitled "Above and Below". In 2000 he was featured in the J.N. Bartfield Galleries catalog and at an Artist Showcase exhibit at Trailside Galleries.

In the United States his oils are shown at J.N. Bartfield Galleries (New York City), Trailside Galleries (Jackson, Wyoming and Scottsdale, Arizona), Broadway Gallery (Alexandria, Virginia), John Collette Fine Art (Highland, North Carolina), Zantman Art Galleries (Sun Valley and Ketchum, Idaho), The Sporting Gallery (Middleburg, Virginia), the Sporting Life Gallery (Beaver Creek, Colorado), and Montana Trails Gallery (Bozeman, Montana).

Awards & Distinctions

Save The Sound - Official Poster Artist, 1987

Panda Conservation Research/Smithsonian - Print Artist, 1987

Snow Leopard Project/NY Zoological Society, Print Artist, 1987

Kentucky Trout Stamp Competition - Hon. Mention, 1988

Maine Sportsman's Show Wildlife Art - 1st, Hon. Mention, 1989

Official Artist of the Bicentennial of the U.S. Constitution, 1989

OWAA/DuPont Art Contest - 1st & 2nd: 1990, 1st: 1989,'91

Sportsman's Alliance of Maine - Sponsor Artist, 1989,'90,'91

Official N.Y. Audubon Earth Day Artist, 1990

N.Y. Ducks Unlimited - Sponsor Print Artist, 1990,'91,'92

Atlantic Salmon Federation - Special Poster Artist, 1990

Collector Editions Award Of Excellence Nominee, 1990-1994

FFF N.E. Council - Artist of The Year Award, 1991

Rocky Mt. Elk Foundation Artist of the Quarter, Summer 1991

Animal In Art Exhibit - Hon. Mention, Merit Award, 1991

Rocky Mt. Elk Foundation - Premier Sponsor Artist, 1991, 1995

National DU Flyway Program - Selected Print Artist, 1991

Wetlands America - Official Artist, 1991

OWAA Annual Conference - Featured Artist, 1991

New England DU - Sponsor Print Artist, 1992

AIPO Intern. Fishing Expo, Italy - Featured Artist/Poster, 1992

Art For The Embassy Program - Selected Artist, 1992-1995

Collections

Pitman Company Collection, Totowa, New Jersey

Tudor Farms Collection, Cambridge, Maryland

Fly Fishing Federation Museum, Livingston, Montana

Paul Jones Collection, Isla Morada, Florida

National Park of Abruzzi Museum, Italy

U.S. Embassy, Ankara, Turkey

U.S.G.A Headquarters, Far Hills, New Jersey

Shadow Hawk Golf Club, Houston, Texas

PGA Tour Headquarters, Ponte Vedra, Florida

Precision Valve Collection, Yonkers, New York

American Museum of Fly Fishing, Manchester, Vermont

IGFA Museum Headquarters, Florida

Catskill Fly Fishing Museum, Livingston Manor, New York

SustainAbility Newsletter Archive Article (random)

Fall Yard Cleanup

Fall CleanupCleaning up garden and flower beds in the fall is an effective way to control various insect pests. Many insects survive the winter buried in the soil (5-25 cm) or on its surface. Debris left on the soil surface will in fact help the insects to survive.

In winter, the temperature of the soil is higher than the air temperature. Various components in the soil buffer it against severe freezing temperatures. For this reason. insects are able to survive in the soil, protected from the winter cold. Debris left on the soil surface further protects the soil, thus making it more hospitable for overwintering insects and increasing their chances of survival. If you remove the debris, the soil will freeze to a greater depth and more insects will likely die during the winter.

When and How to Remove the Debris
The best time to remove the debris is in early October, after the insects have buried themselves in for the winter. You can remove the debris earlier or later, still with effective results in terms of controlling insects. When removing the debris, it is wise to till the garden and flower beds. Tilling will bring the insects up the soil surface, where they are more susceptible to killing temperatures.

Drenching the soil in the fall with an insecticide to control insect pests is not recommended. In order for an insecticide to be effective, the insect must be active. Insect larvae, pupae and adults overwintering in the soil are not active, and therefore pesticide control at this time of year is ineffective.

Garden Cleanup
Insects that overwinter on the soil surface under garden debris or buried in the soil include the beet leaf miner, cabbage maggot, Colorado potato beetle, flea beetle, imported cabbage worm, onion maggot and spinach carrion beetle. Incorporating organic matter in the fall is recommended, but it should be well tilled into the soil; if left on the soil surface, the organic matter will help protect insects over the winter.

Flower Beds and Shrubbery
In flower beds and shrubbery, a number of insects overwinter successfully under debris or in the soil near the base of ornamentals. Such insects include the currant fruit fly, imported currant worm, pear slugs, rose curculio and spring cankerworm. Removal of the leaf litter and a shallow tillage under ornamentals will help control many of these insects.


Fast Facts

  • The energy we save when we recycle one glass bottle is enough to light a traditional light bulb for four hours.
  • Recycled paper requires 64% less energy than making paper from virgin wood pulp, and can save many trees.

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References and Sources used in this issue of SustainAbility Newsletter Include:

Audubon International
www.auduboninternational.org

The International Sustainability Council
www.thesustainabilitycouncil.org

About.com
www.about.com

Pioneer Thinking
www.pioneerthinking.com

EarthCraft Homes
www.earthcrafthouse.com

The Natural Step
www.naturalstep.org

Animal Aid
www.animalaid.org.uk

Recipes For Sustainability
www.veganrecipes.org.uk

  

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A Coalition for Good - Spreading the Seeds of Sustainability

ISC-Audubon is a coalition of non-profit organizations and initiatives that include The International Sustainability Council (ISC), Audubon Lifestyles, Audubon Outdoors, Planit Green, Broadcast Audubon, and the Audubon Network for Sustainability. 

Funds generated through memberships and donations are used to provide fruit & vegetable seeds, wildflower seed mix, and wildlife feed & birdseed to urban and suburban communities around the world. These seeds are used by communities to establish fruit and vegetable gardens, bird and wildlife sanctuaries, and for the beautification of urban and suburban landscapes by creating flower and native plant gardens.

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